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Conservation plans

Our best-known consultancy service is the production of conservation plans – effectively following the methodology first laid out by James Semple Kerr in 1982, but also recent guidance produced by Historic Scotland, Historic England and the Heritage Lottery Fund.

The purpose of a conservation plan, sometimes referred to as a conservation management plan, is to help you manage your heritage asset.  Equally, you may be anticipating change, or be looking to consolidate your existing knowledge and management procedures, and know that a comprehensive conservation plan will help you manage your site now and into the future.

Our conservation plans investigate the historical development of the study area, analyse the significance of the site and develop a practical, considered and useful set of policies.  The document is always richly illustrated, with many key issues highlighted in diagrams.  We often produce gazetteers, options appraisals and consider feasibility as part of the project – every site requires a different approach.

We have extensive experience of working with a variety of buildings – from small cottages to country houses, library and theatres to post-war university campuses.  Our conservation plans are recognised as being authoritative, effective and accessible – why not browse some of the sample reports highlighted in the case studies?

 


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Case studies:

University of St Andrews

A conservation plan written by Simpson & Brown for the University of St Andrews North Haugh campus. Concentrating on James Stirling's category A-listed Andrew Melville Hall.

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Dumfries House

A conservation plan written by Simpson & Brown for the Great Steward of Scotland's Dumfries House Trust. A four volume report giving unprecedented detail on the house, contents and landscape.

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Kelvingrove Bandstand

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Dunfermline Carnegie Library

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Rothesay Pavilion

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