Simpson & Brown Architects with Addyman Archaeology

Menu
About

About

About

About

About

About

About

About

About

About

About

About

Founded in 1977 as an architectural practice, Simpson & Brown has evolved into a multi-disciplinary firm which now also offers archaeological, architectural history, heritage consultancy and master planning services.

During this time the practice has not only been responsible for conserving some of the United Kingdom’s most important historic structures but has also developed a growing reputation for the design of award-winning contemporary buildings. Our aim is to improve the quality of the built environment through scholarly conservation work and well-mannered contextual design that is true to its time and place. Whilst respecting and acknowledging the past, our architecture strives to respond to the challenges of the future, particularly with regard to sustainable design. We carry out work thorughout the United Kingdom and beyond, a map highlighting some of our many project locations can be found here.

Simpson & Brown also operate an archaeological division – Addyman Archaeology – which has extensive experience and expertise in constructional and field work, historic building analysis and specialist survey techniques. Both Simpson & Brown and Addyman Archaeology are supported by a dedicated architectural history team which specialises in research and historic building consultancy work, including the preparation of conservation plans and heritage assessments.

The practice has also considerable experience in preparing feasibility studies, options appraisals, funding application, condition assessments, legal and expert witness reports, and master plans.

Simpson & Brown, with Addyman Archaeology, is a medium-sized practice of five partners and 30 staff. From its principal office in Leith, Edinburgh, it operates throughout the United Kingdom and abroad. The firm as a whole is committed to quality, good management, continuing professional development and, above all, the interests of its clients. 

 


 

    

Left. St Giles Cathedral, Edinburgh (1979)

Right. The Chapel of St. Albert the great, Edinburgh (2013)